Riverton Man’s Quest For Birdies- Finds Greater Reward In Service

August 17, 2012 by  
Filed under Featured, Heroes, Inspire

 

Special Olympics
Americans Believe  in the Special Olympics

It’s been said that the key to happiness is doing what you love while helping others. For one Riverton man, this appears to be the case. Meet Brad Armstrong, by day he is a full-time marketing manager along with father and husband. He is actively involved in the community and serves in leadership positions in his local LDS ward. If this wasn’t enough to keep one man busy, Brad takes it one step further.

For the better part of the last ten years Brad has voluntarily acted as a golf coach for the University of Utah chapter of the Special Olympics. Every fall, seven to ten special needs athletes find themselves privy to a smiling face and the quirky humor of Brad, who gives personalized attention to every student. Though far better than the average golfer, Brad has never played competitive golf. The majority of his rounds are played with family, including his father Marv and his 90-year-old grandfather Glen (who hit his 8th hole in one last year). For the Armstrong “boys” these rounds mean far more than any great trophy. Trophies or not, in the eyes of his students he might as well be Phil Mickelson.

Attend just one practice and the appreciation of his students is quickly apparent from the laughter and smiles that accompany his words of wisdom found in his metaphorical teachings.

“Now when we putt, we want to be like the elephant. What does an elephant’s trunk do? It’s long and just hangs down, moving side to side. We want to be relaxed like that elephant and just move the putter side to side.” There is immediate laughter when the team is asked to mimic the elephant’s trunk, with long arms and putter in hand.

When asked why he involves himself in the Special Olympics, Brad answers,”It’s just so rewarding. It’s a great opportunity to serve some really great people.”

There is something interesting about service. You don’t need any special skills, credentials or diplomas — just a desire to serve. Brad combines this desire with a passion to improve the lives of those around him. After every session Brad ends practice by asking the team one question, “What’s the most important rule of golf?”

For the well taught pupils the answer is unanimous, “Have fun!” Isn’t that what the American dream is all about? Working hard, improving life and having fun? Well done coach!

If you know of a great hero, let the world know and share their story on AmericansBelieve.com.

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